Black Holes: Complex Physics Cause Mass Matter Absorption


Black Hole

The thought of an object so irresistible with a gravity well so deep that not even light can escape it worries me a bit…

These things are called Black Holes.  They’ve earned this special name because light cannot escape from their powerful grip (that’s the black part) and the matter and energy that is unlucky enough to fall into it never escapes (that’s the “hole” part).  They come with this nifty one way surface called an “event horizon.”  Frankly, I would call it your worst nightmare and I can assure you that if you were traveling across the universe, your galactic GPS would highlight them as areas to avoid.

It is commonly thought that one way a Black Hole can form is by the death of a star.  The theory is that as a star ages, it sheds mass.  This causes the star to lose fuel, and as it loses fuel, it’s temperature falls.  The star eventually reaches a point where it’s outward pressure (caused by it’s heat) can no longer counteract it’s gravitational pull and it collapses.  Lots of things can happen at this point, but if the remaining mass is right, it will form a black hole.

At this point, you’re probably wondering how we know they exist if we can’t see them.  Good question!  Black Holes can be seen by what they do to the space, matter, time and gravity around them as they are warped and dragged, screaming into oblivion.

Consider this:  Where does all the matter and energy go?  What’s on the other side of a black hole?  A white hole spewing matter from our universe into another universe?



27 Responses to “Black Holes: Complex Physics Cause Mass Matter Absorption”

  • parallerity says:

    light has a speed 186,000 miles per sec.,my question is does darkness have a speed ? Maybe darkness travels faster then light but we have no way to test this .Darkness after all is always ahead of light.

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    Unknown replied:

    You could say darkness is faster than the speed of light. But keep in mind that you don’t think of darkness AS a form of light. Darkness is the effect of gravitational forces impacting on light.

    So in the case of black holes, the reason why it is black is because it’s gravitational force is so strong that the speed to escape the black hole exceeds the speed of light. Hence why it is ‘black’ or ‘invisible’ as we cannot the light emitted or reflected from the black hole.

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  • Unknown says:

    Your body will get stretched towards the singularity due to tidal forces around the black hole in a process called “spaghettification” because your body literally ends up looking like a piece of sphagetti.

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  • Sonasia Harris says:

    Im not sure if this is true or not but I thought I was once watched a special on netflix about blackholes and they were mostly talking about what would happen if man crossed one,they said something about a sattilite going into one and it got streched out but thered be know way of knowing what happened after that because of the no light privlage and the sattilite would be to messed up since it got streched therfor wed never see what happens once were close to(sattlite p.o.v)

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  • grumpa says:

    Could black hole be a whirlpool in the middle of an ocean of black matter?

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  • AD styles says:

    i have a question…i know that space and time is a single network. can black holes be the holes that are through time and space…? can they be natural time gates which ends up in different time frames…? or are can they be the passages to another part of our universe…like short cuts…?

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    Stig A. replied:

    Quite possibly, but due to time dillation(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation#Gravitational_time_dilation), where time slows down as gravety increases as seen by an outside observer. Matter falling into a black hole will never be seen by us to actually enter it, it will just slow down more and more as it aproaches the event horizon. It will also be stretched all around the E-horizon and redshifted in colour to become invisible to the naked eye, but not before a large amount of it is transformed into gamma rays.
    However, from the perspective of matter(or an individual) falling into the black hole, nothing extraordinary will happen when when passing through the E-horison, until spaghettification occurs that is. 😉

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