Fall Constellations in the Northern Hemisphere


The Fall Constellations

The Fall Constellations

As the days begin to get shorter and the air gets crisper, it is a great time to get outside to look at the Fall Constellations.  The Fall Constellation Chart above will help you identify some of my favorite constellations in the Northern Hemisphere.  Fall makes for the best constellation viewing.  While the atmosphere is not quite as clear as it is in the winter, it’s an awful lot warmer!

In the Fall, Pegasus, Perseus and Andromeda make their arrival in the night sky.  The dominant constellation is, of course, Pegasus.  Pegasus is named after the winged horse in Greek Mythology.  It can be found by locating the four stars that make up the Square of Pegasus, including the star Sirrah.  Another bright star in Pegasus, 51 Pegasi, is a sun-like star and that was the first star found to contain an extrasolar planet!

Perseus, of Persied Meteor Shower fame, was named after the Greek hero Perseus.  Mirfak is the brightest star in this constellation and is an F5 super giant.  Algol, another bright star found in this constellation, is actually a triple star system, but appears as a single star when viewed from Earth.

Andromeda Galaxy

Andromeda Galaxy

Finally, there is the beautiful Andromeda constellation.  This constellation is named after Andromeda, the princess of the mystical kingdom, Ethiopia in Greek mythology.  Andromeda contains the Andromeda Galaxy and is well worth finding if you want a look at an extraordinary example of a spiral galaxy like our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Enjoy the fall show and remember, the mighty Orion Constellation will soon be making it’s appearance!



3 Responses to “Fall Constellations in the Northern Hemisphere”

  • micheal says:

    sweet dude.

    [Reply]

  • Melody says:

    Cosmic sights are beautiful and inspiring

    [Reply]

  • Stella says:

    Oh my, I saw the Orion many times but never knew what it was!I’m used to be really ineseettrd in astronomy but never got a chance to really connect with it. The closest I got was flipping through library books and I haven’t done that in years. Now, it’s wonderful that I can read about it here! Amazing!:)Thanks alot, kudos!:)

    [Reply]

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