What is the temperature of Outer Space?


The Temperature of Outer SpaceMost of us probably know that it is cold in outer space – but how cold is it, exactly?  Is the temperature of outer space the same everywhere, or does the temperature differ in different areas?  Read on for answers to these questions and more.

Giving a single temperature for outer space is actually inaccurate because the temperature does vary in different areas of space.  Therefore, it is difficult to sum up the temperature of space without giving some clarification of how that overall temperature was determined.

Even though we think of space as being mostly made of up various planets and stars, the reality is the vast majority of space is really just empty space – the space between planets, stars, asteroids, etc.  It is in these empty spaces where the temperature of outer space is at its coldest.  Scientists believe that the temperature in these areas is nearly absolute zero.  Absolute zero is the scientific term for the temperature at which all activity stops – more specifically, the temperature at which molecules, atoms, and electrons stop moving.  This is theoretically the coldest temperature that can be attained.

In more exact terms, the temperature of the emptiness of outer space is about 3 degrees Kelvin.  In the Kelvin temperature scale, 0 degrees is absolute zero,  so obviously the temperature of outer space is nearly absolute zero and very cold!



48 Responses to “What is the temperature of Outer Space?”

  • Bob says:

    So as you travel closer to the sun does space warm up? Is there a point somewhere where it would be a nice 75 degrees?

    [Reply]

    Retroactive replied:

    That’s almost an exact same question I wanted to ask, Bob. Just 1 thing Robert. You forgot to specify the fact that I can’t spell Farenheit. Does that answer your question?

    [Reply]

    mary replied:

    i hope so

    [Reply]

    AbsolutelyNobody replied:

    I would say yes, but I wouldn’t plan on setting up camp in the vacuum of space, 75° or not…

    [Reply]

    chris replied:

    If there are no molicules of matter then there can be no temperature. I wouls say the temperature remains near absolute until you get to the suns atmosphere????

    [Reply]

  • Chinonso ezeoke says:

    More practically the outer space should exist in an equilibrum of temperature since it has planets and minor planets constantly in motion even sometimes collisions occur ,which is converted easily to heat thus keeping system in equilibrum of temperature: so i opined that outes space should neither too cold or hot

    [Reply]

  • David says:

    A vacuum does not have a temperature… not hot… not cold. Due to radiation from the sun, atoms in the atmosphere about 130 km from the surface of the Earth have a temperature of >100 C. http://www.haystack.mit.edu/atm/science/thermo/index.html

    [Reply]

    Retroactive replied:

    How does that Klingon proverb go again about dishes being best served cold in space? Is this Star Trek or am I being served Romulan Ale? WTF is a Kelvin but another form of temperature that we as humans hope to accomplish the fact that the American language is a better form of ways to see how cold or hot space is?

    [Reply]

  • David says:

    “Well, it’s been termed the “smell of space” by just about everyone now. When astronauts come in from a spacewalk and remove their helmets, they’ve reported smells of “seared steak,” “hot metal” and “arc welding on their motorbike.”
    These are all consistent descriptions, not flukes. That lead us to conclude that the sensation is caused by some high-energy vibrations in particles brought back inside which mix with the air.”

    [Reply]

  • Gizzlefraz says:

    If you were to stand in the darkness of deep space and you’re bodys’ heat had the necessary vehicle to be absorbed by the surrounding cold, you would freeze at an “EXPLOSIVE” rate.

    [Reply]

  • vaalix says:

    Think of the Earth as something in a microwave that is heated by radiation from the sun. That is how our planet is heated in conjunction with earths core radiating heat upwards in near perfect harmony.

    Someone needs to figure out how objects in space with electro magnetic fields spin at its north and south poles thusly producing free energy. I think it has something to do with the temp of space.. If scientists would look more to nature for answers to common things, the better off we all will be.

    [Reply]

  • Ragozzi says:

    I thought that space between stars isn’t just empty space, but a space-time fabric…

    [Reply]

  • paul says:

    Space is neither hot or cold,it has no temperature,this myth was perpetrated by NASA simply to explain away the fact that spacesuits could not have regulated heat.
    For confirmation of this one needs to look no further than the NASA website.Google, NASA-what is the temperature of space,there you will see the people who gave you this lie confirming it is in fact a lie.

    [Reply]

    Allan replied:

    As expected, NASA pulled down the Brain Bites video from their site to cover up their lies about Apollo going into “Outer Space”. Glad to see you are a free thinker Paul who knows the truth about NASA’s lies. Sadly, it never dawns on most people (they don’t think it thru) why no other country has ever even attemped to send men to the Moon, not even into orbit around our satellite. NASA may have fooled most that they found a way around The Laws of Themodynamics, but they haven’t made fools out of all of us.

    [Reply]

  • Joe T.H. says:

    There is a form of unexplained dynamic energy that exist between the planets. The fact is there is no void in outer space.

    [Reply]

  • Amar Bhattacharya says:

    A very brief and specific explanation. Good.

    [Reply]

  • Wayne says:

    Sorry to get technical, but there is no such thing as 3 degrees Kelvin…it’s simply 3 Kelvin! The Kelvin scale is a measure of energy and is not based on the freezing point and boiling point of water at standard pressure. Therefore, the Kelvin scale is measured in “Kelvins” not “degrees Kelvin” I.e. outer space has an average temp of 3 Kelvin.

    [Reply]

  • debrahswag4God says:

    I dont know if this is real or not but this pic is really pretty. Does anyone agree?

    [Reply]

  • Mark Briones says:

    I agree with you

    [Reply]

Leave a Comment